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Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program

The FISD occasionally applies pesticides as part of an overall integrated pest management program. All persons applying pesticides on district property are required to receive special training & licensure in pesticide application and pest control measures. In addition, this district has a policy that requires use of non-chemical pest control tactics whenever possible.

West Nile Virus - Prevention and Parent Resources

Information concerning the IPM program or pesticide applications may be obtained by contacting:

Robert

Reyes

IPM Coordinator/Licensed Applicator

FISD Sam Carter Service Center

12025 Rolater Road

Frisco, TX 75035

reyesr@friscoisd.org

469.633.6500

Bryan

Kelley

IPM Coordinator/Licensed Applicator

FISD Sam Carter Service Center

12025 Rolater Road

Frisco, TX 75035

kelleybr@friscoisd.org

469.633.6500

Noel

Nixon

IPM Coordinator/FISD Facilities & Risk Management Crew Leader

FISD Sam Carter Service Center

12025 Rolater Road

Frisco, TX 75035

nixonno@friscoisd.org

469.633.6500

Tim

Walsh

IPM Coordinator/Grounds Department Crew Leader

FISD Sam Carter Service Center

12025 Rolater Road

Frisco, TX 75035

walsht@friscoisd.org

469.633.6500

AHERA Asbestos Management

Copies of the inspections and assessments of asbestos-containing materials and the complete Frisco ISD Management plan are available for review at the FISD Central Administration Building which is located at 5515 Ohio Drive, Frisco, TX 75035.

If you have any questions about the plan or this federally mandated program, please contact Tim Sanz – FISD Risk Management programs at 469-633-6340 or sanzt@friscoisd.org

IS IT SOMETHING IN THE AIR?

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is something most of us tend to ignore; that is until it becomes a problem. Often, our first instinct is to simply spray aerosols or light candles to trick our senses into thinking the conditions have improved. While these treatments may seem to work, they are simply “masking” a larger and more complicated problem.

Many biological & chemical components exist naturally in “fresh air”. It is within the confines of a building envelope that these components may concentrate themselves and become problematic. Indoor air quality problems can contribute to many illnesses ranging from frequent headaches and nausea to an overall feeling of fatigue. The main air constituents in buildings that are of concern are general particulates (dust & debris), microbial spores, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and volatile organic compounds (VOC’s).

Concentrations of chemical odors in buildings are derived from many of the products and machines that we use every day. Computers, copier toner, air fresheners, custodial chemicals, and various aerosol products are some of the main contributors of VOC’s in the indoor environment. It is this mixture of compounds that may amplify within buildings causing the dizziness and headaches as well as overall indoor air quality problems. Other contributing factors in the mixture of indoor air are dust, pollen, dander & fungal spores. Anyone with allergies can tell you all about the sneezing and stuffiness that accompany the rising levels of mold and pollen at various times throughout the year. Maintaining the HVAC systems and utilizing a filtration media that removes an adequate percentage of the everyday allergens is a critical step towards good IAQ.

General ventilation systems are engineered to adequately introduce & distribute fresh air throughout buildings while maintaining a comfortable indoor environment. Within a normal business day, the concentrations of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) within a structure can increase leading to a sense of “stuffiness” due to the number of building occupants and demands on the heating & cooling systems. Advanced energy management controls and sensors now allow for the proper dilution of CO2 in a classroom while saving energy.

This threat of carbon monoxide (CO) issues from building heating systems has been eliminated in many regards with the advent of the geothermal heat pump systems being installed today. A geothermal system, also called a ground-source heat pump, works on a simple premise: the earth below a certain depth, is a constant temperature of about 50 degrees throughout the year. Heat is taken from the ground and transferred to the air in your facility during the winter; the process is reversed during the summer. The loops of piping are buried in the ground surrounding the campus, either vertically or horizontally. The ground loop is connected to a pumping module inside the building, where a mixture of water and liquid antifreeze is circulated through the system. As the liquid moves through the underground pipes during winter months, it absorbs heat from the earth. When the heated liquid reaches the heat exchanger, it is converted through the refrigerant process to warm air and circulated through the building. To cool the school during the summer months, the system simply works in reverse with the flip of a switch.

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