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Broadcast Journalism Team Uncovers Mysteries of Frisco

Oct 31, 2017

If you are looking for unsolved mysteries, old legends, or perhaps a ghost story, in Frisco you call the investigative journalists of Frisco High School. They have a team interested in all things mysterious.

A Frisco High broadcast journalism team for RACC-TV, working under the instruction of teacher Bob Bernet, has created a video about purported ghost stories and old mysteries in Frisco after observing the popularity of programs on the paranormal. They gained experience, last school year, when Hagen Gardiner, Blake Wierwille and Cody Izydor reported on the legend of Frisco’s Goat Man’s Bridge, a railroad bridge located behind St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church.

Bernet suggested the three seniors research old Frisco to investigate structures, which residents had claimed to be haunted. The project would take them out of their comfort zone and lead them to meet with adults from the community.  The experience will help them to become mature, workforce ready graduates.

The broadcast team visited two of the historic homes located at the Frisco Heritage Center, the Crozier-Covington House and the Smith-Muse House. The Crozier-Covington House was built by the widow of John Rufus Crozier in the late 1890s. Nanny Crozier built the beautiful Victorian house in what was then known as Lebanon, at the current site of Frisco’s Richardson BikeMart. The house was restored in the 1970s and 80s by the Sickles family. The City purchased the house and helped move it to the area now known as the Frisco Heritage Center. It was the primary target of the student journalists’ interest, as it is the only building in the center to have any reported paranormal past.

“The Sickles reported hearing strange sounds and seeing ghostly shadows, including a little gray cat,” said Donna Anderson, a member of the Heritage Association of Frisco Board of Directors. “But once the restoration work was done, the noises and strange sounds went away.”

The team interviewed Anderson and center volunteer Jane Whitledge about the history of the house. Though paranormal activity has ceased, it does have its share of eerie and interesting facts. The seventh baluster or spindle on the staircase is turned upside down. Whitledge and Anderson explained that this was a common practice in the 1800s, believed to keep any spirits from traveling upstairs in the night and disturbing the living.

“It doesn’t seem as if Frisco has very many ghost stories,” Gardiner and his team observed, but they continued on with their research.

They found that the front parlor of the Crozier-Covington house has a framed photograph of the late Mr. Crozier. The eyes seem to glow and follow guests around the room. Anderson offered her opinion that it may be a “death photo.”  It was common in the Victorian time to take photos of loved ones shortly after they died, she said. But no one has confirmed this theory.

The team also looked into the history of the Smith-Muse House, a large farm house originally from the Denton County side of Frisco. The team discovered a large oval frame that surrounds a photo of a man with wild white hair and beard standing by a picket fence. The photo has hung in the home as long as the living family members can remember. Who is he? None of the descendants of the Smith family know his identity. 

Frisco’s ghostbusters of RACC-TV failed to find any paranormal activity but they did find out that while much of Frisco’s early history is known and documented, some mysteries remain unexplained. 

Interested in the reporting done by Frisco ISD broadcast students? Check out YouTube where you can find reporting by students at the CTE for FISD-TV and each of the Frisco ISD high schools broadcast teams. Visit here for the team's visit to the Frisco Heritage Center.

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